Free Wind Experiments, Activities, and Book List

wind activities, experiments, and book list

Wind Experiments, Activities, and Book List

March is the perfect month to do a learning unit on wind.  Here are some suggested activities along with a book list.

Have children look out the window or turn on a fan.  Ask the children if they can see wind.  How do they know it is there?

Take a variety of objects, both heavy and light (feathers, paper, rocks, string, chair, etc.), outside on a windy day and have children predict which items will blow the farthest and why.  If you are not able to go outdoors set the objects in front of a fan. Record your findings by graphing how far each item moved.  Help children draw the conclusion that the wind can move light objects farther than heavier objects.

Give each student a zip-loc bag.  Ask them if they can capture the wind.  Lead them in finding ways to capture air in their bags and sealing it.  Ask them the following questions: How did your bag change shape?  What does the wind look like?

wind experiment - catching wind in a bag

Take the students outside and blow bubbles.  Have them demonstrate different ways they can make the bubbles move and change direction (create wind) – waving hands, blowing, fanning them with objects, etc.

Take a weather vane outside on a windy day and show students the direction the wind is blowing.  You can make your own weather vane by inserting a drinking straw into a ball of clay and attaching it to a square of posterboard labeled north, south, east, and west. Cut an arrow with a small point on the bottom (see illustration below) out of lightweight paper and insert it into the straw.  When the wind blows the arrow should turn and point in the correct direction.

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wind experiment - weather vane

Have the children create their own wind by blowing objects across a table with a straw. Have them blow objects of various weights and predict which ones will be the easiest to blow off the table. Have races to see who can blow their object off the table first.

wind2

Observe what is actually in the wind by spreading petroleum jelly on plastic lids or small pieces of cardboard.  Punch a hole in the lids or cardboard, thread with yarn, and hang them in various windy spots outdoors.  After a few hours have students observe them with magnifying glasses.  They may see dirt, seeds, insects, etc.

Create blow art projects by having children blow watered down paint across paper.

Fly kites with the children on a wind day.

Suggested Book List:


The Wind Blew by Pat Hutchins


Feel the Wind by Arthur Dorros


One Windy Wednesday by Phyllis Root


I Face the Wind by Vicki Cobb


Like A Windy Day by Frank Asch and Devin Asch


Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day by A.A. Milne


Kite Day: A Bear and Mole Story by Will Hillenbrand


Curious George Flies a Kite by H.A. Rey

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